Thursday, March 19, 2009

Desserts during egg season

We're getting upwards of two dozen eggs a day now, which means it's time to pull out those recipes that use lots of eggs. Yesterday, I mentioned on Facebook that I was making creme brulee pie, and there were several requests for the recipe. Like many of my recipes, this one came about as a result of serendipity. I was going to make a coconut custard pie, and I had everything mixed together. I just needed to add the coconut, but I couldn't find any. So, I was stuck with a custard pie, which I didn't think anyone in my family would eat, other than my husband. I started thinking about what was in the pie already. What was similar? What would my kids eat? And creme brulee pie was born!


Creme Brulee Pie

Butter a 10-inch, deep-dish pie pan. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Put the following ingredients into a blender and blend on low for about 30 seconds or until all ingedients look well mixed:

2 cups goat milk (can substitute whole milk from the store)
1/2 cup flour
3/4 cup sugar
1 t. vanilla
4 eggs

Pour into pie pan. Sprinkle with nutmeg, and gently sprinkle with turbinado sugar. The turbinado sugar will stay crunchy on top of the pie through the baking process and mimics the flame-kissed top of creme brulee. The batter will be quite runny, so take care when placing in the oven. Bake for 40 minutes. A sharp knife inserted into the center of the pie should come out clean, and the sliced area should stay open and not look watery inside.

Note: If you use store-bought eggs, your pie won't be this yellow. The yolks of our chicken eggs are school-bus yellow, because they free range.

For more recipes, check out Hearth and Soul.

19 comments:

Michelle at Boulderneigh said...

Now that is MY kind of pie -- no pie crust to make! Can it really be that easy? I've GOT to try this!

Caprifool said...

Wow, I make goat brylé often during milking season. It is almost sinfull. This one, I definatly try also. Tank you!

Gizmo said...

I can't wait to try it!! I won't tell my "city" nephews and neice (from the Chicago area) what it is until after they taste it. ;)

piscesgrrl said...

The funniest coincidence... asked my son and nephew what they'd like for lunch just now and Jonathan said, "Creme brulee." Seriously! And 5 minutes later I see this. Woohoo!

Claire said...

Oh my this looks so good! I must try it soon! We, too, have a surfeit of eggs.

But really, who would WANT to use store bought eggs? ;-)

Deborah said...

Yes, Michelle, it really is that easy!

Hi Caprifool, what's bryle?

Gizmo, be sure to tell me what your Chicago relatives think of it.

Whoa, piscesgrrl, that is a funny coincidence! I think I hear the Twilight Zone music again. :)

Well, Claire, you know we haven't bought eggs at the store in seven years, but some people don't have a choice. :( That's why I will always have chickens! (Or I'll become a vegan again.)

Caprifool said...

Deborah,creme brylé is just the way we spell creme brulee over here in europe :-)

Ivy said...

Only if I could reach in and take a bite...!

Carolyn said...

I can't wait to try this! I came over from another farm blog when I saw the recipe I have a flock of ducks and I can't keep up with all the eggs!

Great blog!

Deborah said...

Hi Carolyn, and welcome! If you have duck eggs, it's going to be a gorgeous orange color! Duck yolks are such a beautiful orange. mmmm . . . Hope you'll come back and visit often!

sasa said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Swathi said...

Delicious egg recipe, thanks for sharing with Hearth and soul blog hop .

Anonymous said...

I get 2 dozen eggs a day I could use some recipes

Mabel McGuire said...

I don't know what i did wrong, but my pie is runny after the 40 minutes...

Deborah Niemann said...

Mabel - Do you have an oven thermometer? If your oven is not quite hot enough, you would need to leave it in there for a longer amount of time. Recheck it again in ten minutes. The only other possibility is that you got some of the measurements wrong, which happens to everyone at some time! :)

Jennifer Swedlund said...

I have some real farm eggs from a friend, and they're a bit smaller than the store-bought large eggs. Are the eggs your chickens lay small or large, comparatively?

Deborah Niemann said...

Jennifer - this recipe uses large eggs, which weigh 1.5 pounds per dozen (24 ounces). If you have a kitchen scale, you would use 6 ounces of eggs, but don't worry if you don't have a scale. If the eggs are only slightly smaller, don't sweat it. Use the same number. If your friend has bantam chickens, their eggs tend to weigh half as much as large eggs, so you would use twice as many.

Jennifer Swedlund said...

Oh this was perfect. It was quick and easy and I always have all the ingredients on hand. Have you ever tried it with less sugar? We've been cutting back on sugar lately, and my sweet tooth has definitely been reduced as a result! I'm thinking of trying it with only 1/2 cup sugar next time. Anyone think it will be a disaster?

Oh, and my 2-year-old, who hasn't been exposed to many sweets yet, said it tasted like ice cream. He isn't wrong! It reminds me of a good custard ice cream. :)

Deborah Niemann said...

Jennifer, I think someone told me that she used only 1/2 cup and it turned out well.

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