Saturday, September 3, 2011

How does your garden grow?

Ours is growing quite well!

We have tequila sunrise peppers . . .
which are sweet, but every now and then you think it might be a little hot. Definitely different. I love to slice them in ringlets and put them on pizza. Beautiful!

and cayenne peppers . . .
which are hot! Duh! Most of these will be dried, but we do use them fresh while we have them. This is where the bottles of "red pepper" in the spice aisle come from.

and Amana orange tomatoes . . .
which is an heirloom variety that you can't find in any store. They're delicious, especially in tomato soup!


And the tomato plants that look like they're on steroids! (But it's just composted goat manure!)


We even have melons this year!
which is very unusual for Illinois because we have such a short growing season! That's Orangeglo Watermelon on the left, Charantais in the middle, and Banana Melon on the right.

How is your garden doing?


12 comments:

SkippyMom said...

My MIL gifted me with the heirloom orange tomatoes from her garden - they are AMAZING tasting. It was hard not to eat them like candy. So good. Greatest regret that the summer is now going away. Sigh.

Farmchick said...

Those tomatoes look excellent. I grew some heirlooms as well. Nothing quite like them. I had a terrible time with squash bugs this year, so I am hopeful for better next summer.

Tiggeriffic said...

Garden is doing better now that we have had some good rains. I only got one zuchinee this year. That was unusual.
Lots of tomatoes , green peppers and cucumbers. Green beans are just big enough to pick now. I bought Heirloom seeds/plants this year.. THey taste so good..
Have a Tiggeriffic Day~! ta ta for now from Iowa:)

Crow said...

My garden is not growing. I picked the pumpkins, and the last of the tomatoes and squash. But my herb garden continues on! Those orange tomatoes look tasty. I love tomatoes and am always looking for new varieties.
Next year, we will have a garden that has more homegrown fertilizer!

Elin said...

I am at the end of the season here but the tomatoes still give fruit and perhaps a cucumber and a pepper will grow on their last breath. We haven't had night frost yet but it will come soon.

I have had a good tomato year. I have gotten over 80 of them and I only grow on my balcony so I am quite pleased. If the ones that are green now manage to go red I will get over 100 and that is way past my expectations. One day I will have a garden though and I long to grow pumpkins and squash then. I might try melons but I think it is too cold here in northern Sweden for that.

Deborah @ Antiquity Oaks said...

Welcome, Elin! You can bring your tomato plants inside when that frost comes, and they'll still ripen. If they're in pots that are too big to bring inside, just cut off the stems that have the tomatoes on them and put them in water, and they'll ripen for you!

Elin said...

Hi Deborah!

Yes, I know that. Yet the forecast does not predict frost for at least another week and I will keep them outdoors as long as possible.

I will go with bringing in the branches as my plants are monsters. I wasn't really informed on how much you should trim a tomato plant last spring. I have however gained some knowledge in this so I hope next year's tomatoes will be at least 1 meter shorter...

Laura and Kelly Allen said...

Your produce is lovely. The Cherokee beans we got from you have done amazingly well.
Also, I came across this article about the profitability of organic farming, and thought you might enjoy the read:
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2011-09/asoa-ear083111.php

Anonymous said...

Enjoyed the blog, thanks. Drinking about 2 gallons milk/week and it's getting costly so been thinking of fresh milk but never farmed before. Also like eggs (and tuna) for protein. Not sure where to begin, I suppose land zoned for agricultural/farm use but don't know for sure. Started gardening these past two years (Bell peppers and Sunflowers) which worked well but I probably watered so much it costed more than buying. Maybe next year will be better. Adding goat or sheep milk and eggs would really round it out for me. Thanks again for posting info on your blog.

Deborah @ Antiquity Oaks said...

Laura & Kelly -- I'm so happy to hear the Cherokee beans are doing well for you! Thanks for posting that article. It was very interesting.

Deborah @ Antiquity Oaks said...

Anonymous, welcome to my blog! My book, Homegrown and Handmade, is coming out in a couple weeks, and it is written for people like you. It tells you exactly where to get started! You can do a lot more than you think right where you are, even if you live in a city. The website for the book, http://www.homegrownandhandmadethebook.com also has a lot of information that you'll find helpful. And if you spent a lot of money on watering, then you were either buying bottled water or watering too much. The garden only needs an inch of rain per week. Gardening can save you thousands of dollars a year in food costs.

rachel whetzel said...

I'm starting to dream of what I'll be planting in my first ever winter garden!! (thanks to your post about your tunnel rows) Had my first ever crop of corn this year, grew kale for the first time... ate pea plant greens for the first time this year... lots of firsts!! Onions harvested, garlic in, zucchini done, Squash done, tomatoes going crazy, and pumpkins getting orange, watermelons on the vine (FINALLY) and cucumbers all over the place. It was a good year. Amazing what a little rabbit and goat poo will do. :)

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